Monthly Archives: December 2017

‘Call Me By Your Name’: on the unforgiving pain of first love

When I saw the trailer for Call Me By Your Name, the newest film by Italian filmmaker Luca Guadagnino, a car scene popped up that seemed all too familiar: a woman caresses the hair of her teary-eyed son, and they drive in silence as he whimpers. It immediately became clear to me that this was not going to be a

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‘Beach Rats’ explores the quiet pains of sexual awakening

There is something so deeply heartbreaking about the silence with which one carries pain, the consuming numbness that occurs in reaction to the ache that burdens daily existence. And if the struggles adolescents face in today’s unforgiving world aren’t hard enough, they are amplified tenfold when placed in a context of queerness. This is at the core of Eliza Hittman’s

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Lebanon’s ‘The Insult’ shortlisted for Best Foreign Language Film Oscar

Earlier today, The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced the nine films shortlisted for the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar. The shortlisted films included some major snubs and a big (and welcome) surprise for Lebanon’s The Insult, which has now advanced to the penultimate round of decisions. Directed by Ziad Doueiri, The Insult tells the story of a

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‘I, Tonya’: is Margot Robbie skating her way to the Oscars?

It happens every other year: in a sea of great performances, one familiar actor or actress comes out of nowhere with a career-defining performance that has heads turning. Matthew McConaughey did it when he came out with Dallas Buyers Club, Brie Larson did it when she stole the awards season with Room, Jennifer Aniston shocked audiences with her turn in

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‘Loving Vincent’ pays tribute to Vincent Van Gogh’s artistry

What distinguishes great movies from mediocre ones, among many other things of course, is the love with which the film was made — corny, I admit, but a testament to the labour of filmmakers and artists impassioned by their own ideas and creativity and what could come of each and both. One such example is Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman’s

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